Posted Bill Couzens, Founder Lesscancer.org

http://atlanta.braves.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20080511&content_id=2683212&vkey=news_atl&fext=.jsp&c_id=atl

Braves miss chance to swing pink bats
Unused Mother’s Day bats to be signed, auctioned online
By Mark Bowman / MLB.com

PITTSBURGH — Before their Mother’s Day matinée against the Pirates at PNC Park was postponed by rain, a handful of Braves were planning to be among the many Major Leaguers using Sunday to generate awareness about breast cancer.
Mark Kotsay, Yunel Escobar, Kelly Johnson, Chipper Jones, Brian McCann and Mark Teixeira were the Braves who were planning to use pink bats during Sunday afternoon’s game. Although they didn’t get this opportunity, they will still sign the bats, which will be auctioned off on MLB.com.

“I’ve always used a pink bat [on Mother’s Day], ever since Major League Baseball started doing this,” Kotsay said. “It’s for a good cause.”

Pink bats have become an annual Mother’s Day symbol as part of Major League Baseball’s “Going to Bat Against Breast Cancer” initiative to raise awareness about breast cancer and direct proceeds to Susan G. Komen for the Cure.

Fans play the next big role in this process, as attention will move now to the MLB.com Auction and the gradual arrival of the pink bats that were used and then signed, or just signed by entire teams. Signed home plates and bases with the pink-ribbon logo will also be among the auction items, again with all proceeds going to Komen.

It is a “rolling auction,” so if you don’t see a player’s bat in the next few weeks, keep coming back, because eventually most or all of them show up there.

Fans also can purchase their own personalized “Mother’s Day 2008” pink bats right now for $79 apiece at the MLB.com Shop, with $10 from the sale of each one going to Komen.

Along with using pink bats, players across the Majors were planning to wear pink wristbands, pink titanium necklaces and pink ribbons on their jerseys. When Father’s Day arrives, they’ll do the same with blue items to show their support for MLB’s fight against prostrate cancer.

“Breast cancer and prostrate cancer are both big deals,” Kotsay said. “For Major League Baseball to help fight against these diseases is great. If it’s just one day that you have to use a pink bat or wear a pink wristband, it’s a pretty simple decision.”

Mark Bowman is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.