National Cancer Prevention Day 2018: Policy not Politics

National Cancer Prevention Day 2018: Policy not Politics

Representative Debbie Dingell. (National Cancer Prevention Day 2017)

I am so excited about the approach of the National Cancer Prevention Day Workshop, working with the United States Congressional Cancer Prevention Caucus, and medical professionals from across the country.
 
The resolution was first introduced by Representative Steve Isreal for February 4th, also known as World Cancer Day. Since then, Representative Debbie Dingell is the sponsor. 
 
At the time I wanted more than just a named day. The vision was to use the opportunity to shift attention from a commercial, advertising model of what fighting cancer means, to a roll up your sleeves, working day, that would educate leaders in policy, medicine, and public health in cancer prevention. 
 
As founder of Less Cancer and initiator of National Cancer Prevention Day and Workshop February 7, 2018, we provide critical solutions in cancer prevention. We harness the brightest minds to connect the dots on evidence-based science, which leads to education and hopefully improved policy.
 
Over 50 % of cancers are preventable, with the guidance of experts and evidence-based science Less Cancer addresses those cancers through education, continuing medical education and policies. 
 
Experts review our content, and the workshop provides continuing medical education credits to physicians, nurses and public health professionals. 
 
The leadership for the Caucus in the House is refreshingly bipartisan with a focus on collaboration and evidence-based science. Co-Chairs of the Caucus are Representative Debbie Dingell and Representative Barbara Comstock. For me first-hand, the experience of working with them endorses the ethic that working together is what drives change.

Last year United States Congressional Cancer Prevention Caucus (2017) (from Left) Representatives Barbara Comstock, Debbie Dingell and Less Cancer Board Member Larry Fisher.

Each year we participate in these events I am awakened to the pioneering spirit that encourages us as Americans to dare to reach higher. I am moved by the those that travel distances from across the country to participate. This year we will be streamed live to our Facebook community of 55,000 in over 40 countries. 
 
The workshop will be carried on the University of Virginia’s School of Medicine’s Continuing Education site and will be available year-round for physicians, nurses and public health professionals.

Less Cancer Chairman Donna Eacho

I am inspired by the many that put heads together, following their conscience for what is right. Our extraordinary Chair Donna Eacho and our board of directors are experts whose leadership has been instrumental in the success of these events.

Panel Moderator Journalist and Less Cancer Board Member Miles O’Brien (2017) Also on the panel is Less Cancer Board Rob Bilott, second from the left. Other panel members are Mae Wu (nearest) Jesse Meiller, and John Scully, Ph.D.,

Evidence that points to the fact that prevention is the best way to address cancer. And now the news media is catching up, reporting that prevention is a leading reason for the decline in cancer deaths today. . 
 
When I pursued this journey, I was unclear of the road I would travel. I never thought we would be providing critical content for global participants and experts in cancer prevention. We have reached millions across America and around the globe with evidence-based science and content designed to save lives. 
 
What I know and what I’m clear on it this organization it was founded on love. The work for Less Cancer was established because I wanted to see the end to the suffering that comes with cancer, especially for the Next Generation — all of our children.
 
Many people have made the work of Less Cancer happen. Extraordinary leaders that have come together on issues, policies, and education, guided by evidence-based science that allows us to protect our children from increased incidences of preventable cancers.

Less Cancer Chairman Emeritus, board member Tom Sherman , MD

Today we need to lean into what is different from us, seek to understand with a variety of people and ask yourself how I can best work with those who may be unlike me. 
 
Now is the time to seek solutions. Together.

By | 2018-02-05T09:19:33+00:00 February 5th, 2018|Journal|

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