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About Bill Couzens

Bill Couzens is the Founder of Next Generation Choices Foundation and the Campaigns Less Cancer and Healthy Town. Couzens is also the visionary for National Cancer Prevention Day.
11 02, 2018

Congresswoman Dingell Introduces Bill to Label Asbestos Contaminated Products on National Cancer…

By | 2018-02-11T13:38:44+00:00 February 11th, 2018|Journal|

. Congresswoman Debbie Dingell (D-MI) The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) is pleased to announce the introduction of legislation by Congresswoman Debbie Dingell (D-MI) to protect children and families from asbestos. Dingell’s bill, H.R. 4964, introduced on February 7, 2018, amends the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act to require that children’s cosmetics containing talc include

6 02, 2018

Cancer Risk: Is Perception Aligned with Reality? — Part Three

By | 2018-02-06T07:40:37+00:00 February 6th, 2018|Journal|

Photo by J. Carl Ganter/Vector Center What increases your risk of getting cancer? Is perception aligned with reality? This is Part Three of three articles revealing results of a study by Vector Center for Less Cancer’s National Cancer Prevention Day Workshop. Environmental Factors — Cancer Clusters Evidence-based science has proven environmental toxins can cause cancer. Cancer clusters

5 02, 2018

National Cancer Prevention Day 2018: Policy not Politics

By | 2018-02-05T09:19:33+00:00 February 5th, 2018|Journal|

Representative Debbie Dingell. (National Cancer Prevention Day 2017) I am so excited about the approach of the National Cancer Prevention Day Workshop, working with the United States Congressional Cancer Prevention Caucus, and medical professionals from across the country. The resolution was first introduced by Representative Steve Isreal for February 4th, also known as World Cancer Day. Since

4 02, 2018

Cancer Risk: Is Perception Aligned with Reality? — Part Two

By | 2018-02-04T23:23:37+00:00 February 4th, 2018|Journal|

Photo by Cody Pope/Vector Center What increases your risk of getting cancer? Is perception aligned with reality? This is Part Two of three articles revealing results of a study by Vector Center for Less Cancer’s National Cancer Prevention Day Workshop. Alcohol Is reality data aligned with public perception about links between cancer and alcohol? The

3 02, 2018

Cancer Risk: Is Perception Aligned with Reality? — Part One

By | 2018-02-03T13:59:24+00:00 February 3rd, 2018|Journal|

This is Part One of three articles detailing an original research project created by Vector Center for Less Cancer’s National Cancer Prevention Day Workshop. What increases your risk of getting cancer? Is perception aligned with reality? This is a year when evidence-based science has come under attack in Washington, “fake news” is a new household

3 02, 2018

Thank you, Less Cancer for all you do!

By | 2018-02-03T00:34:41+00:00 February 3rd, 2018|Journal|

I will be joining Less Cancer’s National Cancer Prevention Day this year via Skype. I am honored to be a part of this year’s National Cancer Prevention Day where scientists and others come together to talk about how we can PREVENT CANCER. I have worked closely with Less Cancer over the last few years on

1 02, 2018

Cancer Prevention: from education to action!

By | 2018-02-01T16:26:12+00:00 February 1st, 2018|Journal|

Photo by Sebas Ribas In our digital age, it is all too easy to share or retweet an article or a social media post full of myths, rumors, conspiracy theories, opinions, and misleading news. Recent hot topics have revolved around click-bait, bots, “fake news,” and “alternative facts,” demonstrating that the viral inevitability of information does not

31 01, 2018

More Movement in Childhood for Less Cancer in Adulthood

By | 2018-01-31T15:33:31+00:00 January 31st, 2018|Journal|

Nettie rides to preschool My first and only trip to the nation’s capital was because of cancer. 16 years later, I’m going back because of cancer. It was October, 2002. My dad, Tom Schmidt, was dying of cancer. We came to the National Institute of Health for a miracle but the treatment didn’t work. He